Film A Week Podcast Episode 41: “Kung Fu Hustle”

“Yes. I was saving to become a doctor or lawyer… but this was a chance for world peace.”

Hosts Serg Beret and Patrick Raissi begin their month-long trek through beloved sub-genres of cinema with Stephen Chow’s ode to Looney Tunes and silent films, “Kung Fu Hustle.” Listen as the host talk up the wackiness of the film, choreography that astounds them and all the hilarity from Chow’s mind that ensues.

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Audio Edited by Guillermo Morales
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“Film A Week Podcast” is protected by Fair Use as it is a non-profit review show. Any copyrighted material is that of their respective owners and only used as promotion of their work.

Music Credits
“Hustle” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

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Film A Week Podcast Episode 40: “Clerks” (Classics Revisited)

“I’m not even supposed to be here today, man.”

Classics Revisited comes back as the hosts stop for some snacks at the Quick Stop with 1994’s “Clerks,” beginning Kevin Smith’s View Askewniverse.

Listen as Raissi gushes about the career of Smith with an amazing retrospective and Serg’s reaction ten year after his last viewing. Our audio editor Guillermo aka Tony Malone joins us to give his thoughts as well.

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Music Credits
“Hustle” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

Film A Week Podcast Episode 39: “Swingers”

“You’re so money and you don’t even know it!”

Hosts Serg Beret & Patrick Raissi hang back with Jon Favreau and Vince Vaughn at the height of the Swing revival to figure out the rules of moving on and dating with 1996’s “Swingers.” Warning: this episode is kind of a trainwreck as they try to talk about the neurotic nature of Mike, Vince Vaughn’s breakout role and the abstract indie approach.

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Audio Edited by Guillermo Morales
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“Film A Week Podcast” is protected by Fair Use as it is a non-profit review show. Any copyrighted material is that of their respective owners and only used as promotion of their work.

Music Credits
“Hustle” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

Film A Week Podcast Episode 37: “El Mariachi”

“All I wanted was to be a mariachi, like my ancestors.”

Hosts Serg Beret & Patrick Raissi are joined by Matthew Reveles and head to Mexico with Robert Rodriguez’s debut film, 1992’s “El Mariachi,” the first in the “Mexico” trilogy. Listen as the hosts discuss Rodriguez’s $7,000 budget of the film, the unique take on action and cinema and how this film is a must-watch for any film student.

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Audio Edited by Guillermo Morales
Tumblr @ southcentralian

“Film A Week Podcast” is protected by Fair Use as it is a non-profit review show. Any copyrighted material is that of their respective owners and only used as promotion of their work.

Music Credits
“Hustle” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

Episode 35: “Fantastic Four” (2005)

“Flame on!”

Not every beginning can same the same success critically, so the hosts Serg Beret & Patrick Raissi take a stay at the Baxter Building in New York with 2005’s “Fantastic Four. Listen as the two discuss the great performances of Chris Evans and Michael Chiklis, that badass Doctor Doom costume and how the film actually isn’t as bad as they perceived it to be in the intro.

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Twitter @ HumaneRamblings

Audio Edited by Guillermo Morales
Tumblr @ southcentralian

“Film A Week Podcast” is protected by Fair Use as it is a non-profit review show. Any copyrighted material is that of their respective owners and only used as promotion of their work.

Music Credits:
“Hustle” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
“Fantastic Four” Theme Song © 1994 Marvel Entertainment

Film Review – Blade Runner: The Final Cut (1982)

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Blade Runner, released in 1982, became a landmark in cinema blending the imagination of science fiction and the bleakness of classic noir elements. Directed by Ridley Scott, the film stunned the audiences in the cineplexes by taking what essentially is an art house vision of the future and expanding it into the mainstream expanse of the modern theater. Yet, the film always felt a tad off.

The narration felt out of place, the violence not as dangerous as the world surrounding it and the ending was something left to be desired. Fortunately, time had been kind to the film with a Director’s Cut filling some of the void in 1992 and an international cut that retained the danger of the brutality. In 2007, the film was given the treatment cinephiles felt it deserved with Scott back to supervise and recut what many consider his masterpiece. Blade Runner: The Final Cut solidifies that statement.

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Based on the novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick, Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), a former Blade Runner whose job was to kill (“retire”) bio-engineered androids known as Replicants. Though retired, Officer Gaff (Edward James Olmos) and Captain Harry Bryant (M. Emmett Walsh) inform Deckard of four Nexus 6 model replicants that have come to Earth illegally from an Off-World colony including Roy Batty (Rutger Hauer) and Pris (Darryl Hannah). Deckard heads off to the Tyrell Corporation for more insight on why the replicants might be on Earth, Deckard comes upon the Replicant named Rachael (Sean Young), a new experimental replicant who can pass easily for an ordinary human. With this new information at hand, Deckard returns to retire the replicants for good.

The Final Cut captures the essence of what Scott envisioned in the first go around. It’s intimate, dire, epic and hopeful. From the opening shot entering a Los Angeles rooted in fire and darkness, Scott shows that this story is going to be rooted within that heavy darkness. Brightness appears here and there, but in short bursts to add visual levity to the heaviness that surrounds. It’s remarkable in its production and scope with a combination of models, matte paintings and soundstages to make the year 2019 a grimy one. Among it, however, is a detective story firmly inspired by the noir genre complete with a femme fatale, a down-and-out detective and an antagonist after something they long for. While no Macguffin is clearly present, the desire to be human and be more than just what one currently feels omnipresent in the characters.

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Huaer as Batty evokes this feeling in his performance standing out among the humans as someone with true emotion and understanding. Batty desires the sense to be a better model in the same vein as Rachael despite going through nefarious means to get to that point with the others. Batty is more than just an automaton, but rather as complex as the framework he is made with. Deckard evokes this trying to get back in the swing of things and the desire to escape his old Blade Running days with his romantic interactions with Rachael. He has a burden on his back to himself stuck in his hard drinking retirement looking for a form of purpose. Rachael, who is not completely aware of her replicant state, desires to know her purpose in life and why she is desireable to both parties. The performances from all three add significance and weight to their respective characters in the desire to be their ideal version of humanity. The story is made stronger as well going from a simple noir story to a intricate one about the err of humanity and technology.

Vangelius’ score is the sound of the future, even at this point in time. Elements of old jazz and cliche noir stylings are blended with synthesizers, strings and ambience. It’s meticulous in its design going from the darkest of tones to the most hopeful of sounds seamlessly as the film progresses and goes on. Not once does it feels hokey or oft-putting, but rather adds. Even the love theme, complete with sensual saxophone, does not feel out of place in its structure. Scott’s direction and work of cinematographer Jordan Cronenweth gives the desired result of the neo-noir setting with the starkness of black, the beautiful terror and wonder of night and the marginal greatness of daylight when it appears. Certain shots, including the shot of the Geisha advert and the sun setting, can be art pieces in their own right. The pacing is methodical, but never boring with visual effects that are stunning in their practicality from built models of flying cars, rear projections of the backgrounds and violence that feels real and brutal.

Blade Runner: The Final Cut is a masterpiece of cinema taking what came before it in the realms of mystery, action and science fiction to blend it into gorgeous mixture. It excites and provokes the mind by perfecting a vision that more than just androids can dream.

Welcome to ‘Valley/Wood,’ a new Lyrics Collection by Serg Beret

ValleyWood1

The newest Lyrics Collection has arrived. That’s right, there was a reason for all those newly published lyrics earlier as they are part of Valley/WoodValley/Wood is the latest in collections of lyrics, this time focusing on the newly acquired sense of being for the narrator character of the previous outings RGHTS and (E)(P) Escapade Perchance.

The narrator returns to reside in the town of Valley/Wood. It is here that we find him dreaming once again of romance in lyrics such as “Dream Too Much,” “Morning Star,” “Safe by You” and “Keep.” He also reflects and reveals the subject of the pain on RGHTS in “ane,” “oyl,”  & “method: Madness” and discusses his failed romances in “Fantom” & “Kimber Li.” Other lyrics include the commentary on the banality of popular music in “Banal,” the tribute to a lover’s dream in “Second Light” and the dramatic realization of the one that got away in the closing lyrics “Much to Dream.”

Of course, it is always open for more interpretation than just the descriptions above. Please read and enjoy this wonderful collection of lyrics.

Valley/Wood

  1. Dream Too Much
  2. Safe by You
  3. Morning Star
  4. Keep
  5. oyl
  6. Fantom
  7. Banal
  8. ane
  9. Samantha
  10. method: Madness
  11. Kimber Li
  12. Second Light
  13. Much To Dream

ValleyWoodBackCover

Lyrics: “method: Madness”

Hear a spirited voice saying
“Come closer, get enraptured by the waves of love”
I slip away from the current
I’m not ready to wash away

I’ve become disillusioned
To the notion that someone is gonna save me
And only the one being will stay
Many ones have gone away

Put it out to pasture
A preconceived dream wasting time
Still yearn for the affection
But yanking a promised ring is where I drew the line

There’s a method to Aphrodite’s madness
Admiration of the heart is on high
There’s a method to Erida’s madness
Bellicose feud is now nigh

Got only one picture of you
Shot against the light of the setting day
Your visage is not in view
Only a shadow sits in a frozen state

It truly represents you
A former lively hominid
Only a static image never moving
A reflection of your current place

Hope the waves enrapture your being
Drown you to your lowest point
Feel as I did when your oxygen
Was no longer my breath of choice

There’s a method to Aphrodite’s madness
Admiration of the heart is on high
There’s a method to Erida’s madness
Bellicose feud is now nigh

Hear your spirited voice calling
“Come closer, get enraptured by my waves”
I slip away from your current
I’m not yours to wash away

Lyrics: “Much To Dream”

Bright Eyes started playing last night
The scene started out right
“First Day of My Life” blaring in stereo
Scoring the wonderment of imagination
But it wasn’t her in the scenes

They played out similarly as before
These moments from reality
I reshaped and reframed every point
Set up the marks in different positions
And replaced her with you

You, yourself, who is so much to dream
I, myself, too late to see that seam
Sewn in the fabric of a writer’s dreams
Your love is too much to dream

It was running all over again
Us holding hands as lovers on the beach
Intimate moments became simple and clean
We kissed under the moonlight and against sun’s setting
We pull each other close and embrace
Goosebumps build and our hearts race

You, yourself, who is so much to dream
I, myself, too late to see that reality
Deep in the framework of a writer’s dream
Your love is too much to dream

When I wake
You’ll be gone
When I wake
You aren’t in my
Reality

Though I wish you would be
For the scars internal bleed
I need healing
I need feeling

But you are too much to dream
You are way too much to dream
Why couldn’t I make this
Actuality?

But I dream too much
I dream too much

Lyrics: “Second Light”

Are you the light to brighten up
This darkened world?
Are you the dream brought into life
For me to seek?

Yet you could be a thoughtful fantasy
A million have already wish to be
With them, holding them, embracing them
Throughout all the odds and ends

Magnificent in every way
Your light shines on me
Makes the grey and overcast
Into a brighter day on Earth
You are my second light

Am I the light to brighten up
Your darkened world?
Am I a dream brought into life
For you to seek?
That last inquiry was absolutely dumb
Of me

Yet you could be a fun and fancy free dream
A million have tried to find
Around them, surrounding them, waiting for them
Through their lives’ odds and ends

Magnificent in every way
Your light shines on me
Makes the grey and overcast
Into a brighter day on Earth
You are my second light